A North Carolina Administrative Law Judge held that the Department of Revenue did not have the authority to adjust the taxpayer’s net income because the Department failed to timely issue a statutorily required written statement.

The Department believed the taxpayer had not accurately reported income properly attributable to North Carolina due to intercompany transactions that

This week on the SALT Shaker Podcast, Eversheds Sutherland Associate Jeremy Gove is pleased to welcome Professor Richard Pomp, a state and local tax professor at both the University of Connecticut School of Law and NYU School of Law, to discuss the pending U.S. Supreme Court cert petition in Quad Graphics, Inc. v. North Carolina

The North Carolina Department of Revenue issued a letter ruling that concluded an online platform owner and administrator was not a marketplace facilitator because it neither collected nor otherwise processed payment for any items sold on the website. The taxpayer requesting the ruling was an affiliate of original equipment manufacturers “OEMs), and operated a platform

The North Carolina Department of Revenue issued a private letter ruling finding that a business-to-business online platform where businesses list inventory for sale for other businesses to order and pay was a marketplace facilitator responsible for collecting and remitting tax on sales that took place over its platform. The platform was not open to the

On May 24, 2021, the North Carolina Department of Revenue published Private Letter Ruling No. SUPLR 2021-0019 (dated April 29, 2021). The taxpayer is a North Carolina based company that provides subscriptions to information hosted in the cloud which its customers access through a web portal in exchange for a subscription fee. The industry-specific information

The North Carolina Department of Revenue issued a private letter ruling, concluding that subscription fees for a Software as a Service (SaaS) product are non-taxable. The taxpayer licenses a cloud-based SaaS platform for customer engagement and marketing, which customers access via the Internet.  The taxpayer charges customers a subscription fee for monthly access. The

The North Carolina Department of Revenue released a private letter ruling, concluding that a web-based product used to handle administration, management, and record-keeping via a Software as a Service model was not subject to sales and use tax. Consumers accessed the software application, which was running on a cloud-based infrastructure. The ruling states: “North

In Private Letter Ruling 2020-14, the North Carolina Department of Revenue determined that an information technology company’s managed services – maintaining and monitoring its clients’ network equipment and software – were subject to sales and use tax. The taxpayer’s Terms of Use, which sets the scope of its services, qualified as a taxable service