On May 24, 2021, the North Carolina Department of Revenue published Private Letter Ruling No. SUPLR 2021-0019 (dated April 29, 2021). The taxpayer is a North Carolina based company that provides subscriptions to information hosted in the cloud which its customers access through a web portal in exchange for a subscription fee. The industry-specific information

The North Carolina Department of Revenue issued a private letter ruling, concluding that subscription fees for a Software as a Service (SaaS) product are non-taxable. The taxpayer licenses a cloud-based SaaS platform for customer engagement and marketing, which customers access via the Internet.  The taxpayer charges customers a subscription fee for monthly access. The

The North Carolina Department of Revenue released a private letter ruling, concluding that a web-based product used to handle administration, management, and record-keeping via a Software as a Service model was not subject to sales and use tax. Consumers accessed the software application, which was running on a cloud-based infrastructure. The ruling states: “North

In Private Letter Ruling 2020-14, the North Carolina Department of Revenue determined that an information technology company’s managed services – maintaining and monitoring its clients’ network equipment and software – were subject to sales and use tax. The taxpayer’s Terms of Use, which sets the scope of its services, qualified as a taxable service

On June 30, the North Carolina Governor signed into law a wide-ranging tax bill that includes marketplace facilitator rules for meals taxes and clarifies sales tax for download codes. HB 1080 extends marketplace facilitator collection and remittance obligations to local meals taxes, effective July 1, 2020. In addition, the law clarifies that the sale of

The North Carolina Supreme Court affirmed a lower court decision that held that a manufacturer of brake pads used by railroads did not qualify for an exception to the state’s standard three-factor apportionment formula that allows “public utilities” to instead apportion their income using a single-sales factor formula.

In February 2019, the North Carolina Superior