On June 5th, the Maryland Court of Appeals held that a reduced interest rate on refunds paid to taxpayers as a result of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Comptroller of Maryland v. Wynne did not violate the U.S. Constitution’s dormant Commerce Clause.

In 2018, the U.S. Supreme Court held that a Maryland statute that

The North Carolina Supreme Court affirmed a lower court decision that held that a manufacturer of brake pads used by railroads did not qualify for an exception to the state’s standard three-factor apportionment formula that allows “public utilities” to instead apportion their income using a single-sales factor formula.

In February 2019, the North Carolina Superior

On May 22, 2020, the Idaho Supreme Court held that the gain realized by a corporate holding company on the sale of its 78.54 percent ownership interest in an LLC was nonbusiness income and therefore not subject to apportionment in Idaho. The LLC was formed in 2003 and manufactured and sold tangible personal property. The

On June 12, 2020, a federal court partially denied Kroger Co.’s motion to dismiss a putative class action complaint regarding Oregon’s bottle deposit on beverages. The complaint alleged that Kroger had misrepresented the cost of certain beverages by charging a ten-cent bottle deposit for beverages that were exempt from the bottle deposit and failing to

The Alabama Tax Tribunal held that a taxpayer’s payments to an affiliated entity for employee services were not included in the payroll factor of the apportionment formula for business-income tax purposes because the payments were not made directly to the taxpayer’s employees.

During the years at issue, an Alabama regulation stated that only amounts paid

The South Carolina Court of Appeals affirmed the Administrative Law Court’s holding that proceeds from a book retailer’s sales of book club memberships should have been included in the retailer’s “gross proceeds of sales” and subject to sales tax. The Court of Appeals concluded that South Carolina case law provides that the gross proceeds of

The Tennessee Court of Appeals held that a manufacturer’s proceeds from a legal malpractice action are business earnings subject to the Tennessee excise tax. The malpractice action arose when the taxpayer’s attorneys improperly filed a European patent. The damages awarded in settlement of the claim were based on profits the taxpayer would have earned if