corporation business tax

The New Jersey Tax Court rejected the Division of Taxation’s application of a five-factor alternative apportionment formula as invalid rulemaking under New Jersey’s Administrative Procedures Act (APA). The Tax Court previously determined that an application of the statutory apportionment formula in effect prior to 2011 for companies without a “regular place of business” outside New

The New Jersey Tax Court upheld the New Jersey Division of Taxation’s use of the 25/50/25 sourcing rule for “certain services” against a provider of mass messaging services by fax, email and voice. Specifically, the court upheld the Division’s determination of a 76% receipts factor, which consisted of 25% for all transactions originating in New

In the midst of a budget showdown between New Jersey’s Legislature and Governor Murphy, on June 25, 2018, the Legislature passed a replacement bill that seeks to raise revenue with a temporary Corporation Business Tax “surtax” on corporations meeting certain income thresholds and by limiting New Jersey’s dividend exclusion. The Legislature also responded to the

In a recent unpublished decision, Residuary Trust A v. Director, Division of Taxation (Kassner), the New Jersey Appellate Division relied on the “square corners doctrine” to hold that the New Jersey Division of Taxation was prohibited from imposing tax for the 2006 tax year based on a policy change not announced until 2011. In

By Nicole Boutros and Amy Nogid

The New Jersey Tax Court ruled that the Division of Taxation (“Division”) properly required a foreign (non-New Jersey domesticated) corporation to file corporation business tax (“CBT”) returns reporting licensing revenue from its parent attributable to New Jersey, based on New Jersey’s economic presence nexus standard, despite the parent’s royalty

By Robert P. Merten III and Prentiss Willson

The New Jersey Division of Taxation has issued a technical advisory memorandum (TAM) explaining New Jersey’s tax position that transactions involving convertible virtual currency— “electronic/digital money” with an equivalent or substitute value in real currency, such as bitcoins—are subject to state tax liability, including sales and use

New Jersey law contains a little-known, one-sentence provision with substantial implications for companies contesting corporate tax assessments in the New Jersey Tax Court: Filing a Tax Court complaint for one tax year causes the statute of limitations period for assessing additional tax for all subsequent open years to remain open—with no defined closing date—for any