By Liz Cha and Todd Lard

Applying the “true object” test to the taxpayer’s web-based services, the Tennessee Department of Revenue ruled that charges for granting access to the taxpayer’s website for purposes of obtaining information would not be subject to sales tax. While the access to web-based services is tax-exempt as a sale of

By Nicole Boutros and Jeff Friedman

The Director of the Arizona Department of Revenue affirmed an Administrative Law Judge determination that a taxpayer must pay the Transaction Privilege Tax on sales of access to the taxpayer’s subscription-based online research service. The Director reasoned that these sales were taxable as rentals of tangible personal property—and not

By Mary Alexander and Andrew Appleby

The Tennessee Court of Appeals held a wide area network (WAN) service provided by IBM was not taxable because the true object of the service was not a “telecommunications service.” IBM’s WAN service was a technological infrastructure that enabled remote access to information by linking geographically separated computers. The

By Shane Lord and Timothy Gustafson

The Tennessee Court of Appeals held that a taxpayer’s wholesale service of converting end-user information into Internet protocol was an “enhanced” service for which the true object or primary purpose was to provide the non-taxable service of “Internet access” and not the taxable service of “telecommunications.” Adopting definitions set forth

By David Pope and Timothy Gustafson

The Virginia Tax Commissioner determined that an out-of-state manufacturer was subject to use tax on “local marketing group” fees charged to its customers because the true object of the transaction was the sale of tangible personal property. The taxpayer manufactured heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems for sale

By Saabir Kapoor and Andrew Appleby

The Colorado Department of Revenue (Department) determined that sales tax does not apply to a subscription fee for an interactive stock screening service. The taxpayer, a financial news and research organization, offered proprietary web-based stock screening tools to customers for a monthly subscription fee. To determine whether the subscription

By Suzanne Palms and Andrew Appleby 

The Michigan Court of Appeals held that a taxpayer was not liable for additional single business tax (SBT) and use tax because the taxpayer was making sales of tangible personal property at its Michigan facility rather than performing a service. The taxpayer’s business activities at issue consisted of