The Mississippi Supreme Court held that a state chancery court erred in deferring to the Mississippi Department of Revenue and Mississippi Gaming Commission’s  regulatory interpretation of a Mississippi tax statute governing the computation of the state gaming license fee. However, the court agreed with the chancery court that costs of prizes from casino rewards program

Mississippi law requires “retailers” to collect and remit sales and use tax. In August 2018, the Mississippi DOR issued guidance that remote sellers with in-state sales above $250,000 are retailers required to collect sales and use tax. H.B. 379 would expand the definition of retailer to include persons who facilitate third-party sales with the same

By Jessica Eisenmenger and Tim Gustafson

The Supreme Court of Mississippi held that a county had the right to a jury trial in an appeal of the county’s ad valorem tax assessment. In reaching its decision, the court relied on centuries-old customs, practices and decisions upholding the right to a jury trial in tax assessment

By Charles Capouet and Timothy Gustafson

The Mississippi Chancery Court held that the state’s dividend exclusion statute is unconstitutional because it violates the Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution. The statute excludes from a taxpayer’s gross income intercompany dividends received from domestic affiliates doing business and filing income tax returns in Mississippi. In so doing

By Suzanne Palms and Tim Gustafson

In direct response to the Mississippi Supreme Court’s decision in Equifax, Inc. v. Miss. Dep’t of Revenue, wherein the court upheld the Department of Revenue’s use of market-based sourcing despite the taxpayer’s use of cost-of-performance sourcing in compliance with the governing statute, Mississippi’s Governor signed House Bill (HB)

By Madison Barnett and Prenitss Willson

The Mississippi Supreme Court held that a casino operator was entitled to use tax credits—specifically, gambling license fee credits—earned by one combined group member to offset the entire combined group’s liability. Mississippi is generally a separate return state, but taxpayers may elect to file a post-apportionment, nexus-combined return. The