On May 22, 2020, the Idaho Supreme Court held that the gain realized by a corporate holding company on the sale of its 78.54 percent ownership interest in an LLC was nonbusiness income and therefore not subject to apportionment in Idaho. The LLC was formed in 2003 and manufactured and sold tangible personal property. The

The Supreme Court of Idaho upheld the lower court’s judgment that the Idaho Reimbursement Incentive Act (“IRIA”) does not violate the separation of powers provisions of the Idaho Constitution because the IRIA does not delegate lawmaking powers to an administrative body and the IRIA does not limit judicial review. An administrative agency created under the

Understanding states’ various approaches to accountant-client privileges can make the difference in protecting communications from disclosure in litigation. In this edition of A Pinch of SALT, Sutherland SALT’s Pilar Mata and Melissa Smith examine the scope and breadth of accountant-client privileges that have been adopted by some states.

Read “Demystifying Accountant-Client Privileges in State

Indiana just launched a new unclaimed property compliance enforcement effort that is bringing unwelcome news to some holders. In early April, Indiana sent out formal notices to holders indicating that fines could apply for failure to timely report and remit unclaimed property. In some cases, not only did holders receive the warning notice, but also an actual assessment and invoice reflecting the threatened fines. The letters accompanying these assessments indicated that the holder has 60 days to pay the assessment, including the fine, or demonstrate to the Indiana unclaimed property authorities that the assessment was incorrect. Adding salt to the wound, the letters indicated that failure to comply may subject the company to an audit.

Idaho, on the other hand, recently passed a law that eases the compliance burden associated with reporting unclaimed corporate securities and related distributions. HB 174 (effective July 1, 2011). Idaho’s new law makes two major changes to corporate securities reporting: (1) a requirement that the owner is actually “lost” before the dormancy period commences, and (2) clarification of the requirements for reporting unclaimed dividends paid pursuant to dividend reinvestment program accounts (DRIP accounts).


Continue Reading The “I’s” Have It: Indiana and Idaho Unclaimed Property Developments