The U.S. Supreme Court recently ruled in Expressions Hair Design v. Schneiderman that a New York statute that prohibits identifying a surcharge to customers for credit card payments regulates speech and is therefore subject to heightened scrutiny. 

The court remanded the case to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit to determine whether

A recent US Supreme Court decision on surcharges strengthened taxpayers’ First Amendment rights when deciding how they present pass-through fees and taxes to their customers.

  • The Supreme Court held that a New York statute prohibiting a seller from imposing a credit surcharge was a speech regulation, subject to heightened scrutiny, because it regulates how retailers

By Nicole Boutros and Scott Wright

A New York State Division of Tax Appeals administrative law judge (ALJ) determined that a telecommunications provider’s electricity purchases were not exempt from sales tax as sales for resale. In so doing, the ALJ rejected the taxpayer’s assertion that it resold electricity by incorporating it into its telecommunications services

By Mike Kerman and Charlie Kearns

The New York Department of Taxation and Finance issued an advisory opinion concluding that a taxpayer that collects and furnishes healthcare information on behalf of healthcare providers, such as medical practices and hospitals, to persons requesting copies of medical records is not performing a service subject to New York

On December 29, 2016, a New York City administrative law judge (ALJ) determined that Sprint’s long distance telecommunications service fees were exempt from the City’s Utility Tax. In the Matter of the Petitions of U.S. Sprint Communications Co., LP, TAT (H) 14-12 (UT) et al. Sutherland represented Sprint in the matter.

  • The ALJ concluded

On January 5, 2017, a New York State Division of Tax Appeals administrative law judge (ALJ) determined that a taxpayer’s electronic bill payment and presentation receipts constitute “service” receipts and not “other business receipts,” and are properly sourced where the service is performed. In the Matter of the Petitions of Checkfree Services Corp. 

  • New York

By Zack Atkins and Marc Simonetti

A federal district court denied a taxpayer’s motion to dismiss a lawsuit brought under the New York False Claims Act (FCA) for lack of subject matter jurisdiction and remanded the action to state court. The relator, an Indiana University professor, alleges that Citigroup violated the FCA by deducting net

By Jessica Allen and Jonathan Feldman

The New York City Tax Appeals Tribunal administrative law judge (ALJ) determined that a taxpayer’s receipts for consulting services should be allocated based on where the services were rendered, not where the solicitation and payment for the services occurred. The taxpayer’s non-commissioned salespeople entered into lump-sum subscription agreements with