On June 21, 2018, the US Supreme Court struck down the “physical presence rule” of Quill and National Bellas Hess which barred states from imposing sales tax collection requirements on certain out-of-state sellers. This decision is expected to have a significant impact on online sales across the country.

The case, South Dakota v. Wayfair,

By Jeff Friedman and Stephanie Do

Following an unfavorable court decision, state legislatures have been able to effectively reverse a decision by retroactively changing the law. Several taxpayers have challenged the validity of retroactive state tax changes by arguing that the retroactive laws violate the US Constitution’s Due Process Clause, which requires that no state

A recent US Supreme Court decision on surcharges strengthened taxpayers’ First Amendment rights when deciding how they present pass-through fees and taxes to their customers.

  • The Supreme Court held that a New York statute prohibiting a seller from imposing a credit surcharge was a speech regulation, subject to heightened scrutiny, because it regulates how retailers

By Charles Capouet and Jeff Friedman

In a 4-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court affirmed the Nevada courts’ exercise of jurisdiction over the California Franchise Tax Board (FTB), but held, by a majority of the justices, that the taxpayer could only receive the damages Nevada provides for suits by private citizens against Nevada agencies. The

On March 22nd, South Dakota Governor Daugaard signed into law Senate Bill 106, the passage of which may be the ultimate vehicle to challenge Quill at the U.S. Supreme Court. With landslide support in the South Dakota Senate and House of Representatives, S.B. 106 adopts an economic nexus standard for sales tax remittance and allows

By Evan Hamme and Andrew Appleby

The Oklahoma Supreme Court held that an initiative to amend the state’s constitution does not violate the state’s constitutional rule that a public vote to amend the constitution must address only one general subject (one general subject rule). Although the proposed constitutional amendment contains multiple sections making multiple proposals,

Yesterday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit issued its opinion in Direct Marketing Association v. Brohl, reversing the district court’s order granting summary judgment. The Tenth Circuit held that Colorado’s notice and reporting requirements imposed on non-collecting retailers did not violate the dormant Commerce Clause because they neither discriminated against, nor

By Mike Penza and Madison Barnett

The New York Supreme Court, Albany County, held that New York’s unapportioned vehicle registration fees violated the Commerce Clause. The court found that the flat fees—imposed on all carriers operating motor vehicles in New York—were indistinguishable from those struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court in American Trucking Ass’ns.,

By Charles Capouet and Charlie Kearns

The Kentucky Supreme Court held that the interpretation of inheritance tax statutes by the Kentucky Board of Tax Appeals was not entitled to Chevron deference. Deference is given only to an administrative agency’s interpretation of the statutes which it administers. The Board is merely a reviewing tribunal; it is