On July 21, 2022, the Regular Division of the Oregon Tax Court ruled that flights operated by all members of a unitary group are included in a taxpayer’s departure ratio and that receipts for selling tickets on flights operated by third parties do not constitute transportation revenue under the state’s special industry apportionment rules for

The Oregon Tax Court, Regular Division, held that P.L. 86-272 did not preclude Oregon from imposing its excise (income) tax on an out-of-state manufacturer of cigarettes and other tobacco products based on two activities. First, the court held that the manufacturer’s mandate that the in-state wholesalers accept product returns was not a protected activity. The

In this episode of the SALT Shaker Podcast, host and Eversheds Sutherland Associate Jeremy Gove rolls out a new discussion format—East/West/Middle. Joining Jeremy for this discussion are Partners Nikki Dobay and Breen Schiller, and Counsel Michael Hilkin, and the four discuss the similarities and differences of protesting an assessment in New York (East),

This week, members of the Eversheds Sutherland SALT team will continue presentations for several key industry organizations and associations:

Just days before Oregon’s legislature is set to adjourn, SB 164, the Corporate Activity Tax (CAT) “technical corrections” bill, cleared its final hurdle in the Oregon legislature and will now be sent to the Governor for signature. Specifically, on June 24, SB 164 passed the House of Representatives by a unanimous vote of those in

On May 24, 2021, the Magistrate Division of the Oregon Tax Court denied a taxpayer’s motions for summary judgment, finding the taxpayer’s claim for refund was filed beyond the statute of limitations.  Specifically, on December 4, 2015, the taxpayer filed its Oregon corporation excise tax return for tax year end February 28, 2015. The taxpayer

On June 8, the Oregon Senate passed SB 164, which is the 2021 Corporate Activity Tax (CAT) “technical corrections” bill. SB 164 has moved to the House, where it has been referred to the House Revenue Committee. To become law—which is expected—SB 164 will be required to pass out of the House Revenue Committee and