The State of New Mexico Administrative Hearings Office held that the New Mexico Taxation and Revenue Department could not remove the payroll factor from the apportionment factor calculation of a taxpayer in the credit card and personal lending business. The Hearings Office determined that “the party seeking to depart from the proscribed apportionment method,” which,

This is the eleventh edition of the Eversheds Sutherland SALT Scoreboard, and the third edition of 2018. Each quarter, we tally the results of what we deem to be significant taxpayer wins and losses and analyze those results. This edition of the SALT Scoreboard includes a discussion of California combined reporting, insights regarding the Washington

The New Mexico Court of Appeals upheld the imposition of gross receipts tax on certain trademark-related royalty fees received by an out-of-state corporation pursuant to its franchise agreements with New Mexico businesses. The court examined whether, following statutory amendments in 2007, the royalty fees flowing from a limited trademark license provision contained within the franchise

The New Mexico Administrative Hearings Office affirmed the Taxation and Revenue Department’s assessment based on General Electric’s exclusion of foreign dividend and Subpart F income from its base income in its New Mexico consolidated return. In this case of first impression, the Hearings Office held that New Mexico’s inclusion of dividends and Subpart F income

By Chris Mehrmann and Charlie Kearns

A New Mexico Taxation and Revenue Department administrative hearing officer found that a seller could not use equitable recoupment as a defense to offset gross receipts (sales) tax assessed on its sales of software licenses. In support of its equitable recoupment argument, the seller maintained that third-party lenders that

By Derek Takehara and Andrew Appleby

The New Mexico Department of Taxation and Revenue granted a combined reporting group’s corporate income tax protest by allowing the group to claim a deduction for net operating losses (NOLs) that two of its members generated and reported previously on a separate entity basis. The taxpayer was the parent

The New Mexico Court of Appeals held that for purposes of imposing the state’s gross receipts tax, Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Inc.’s (Booksellers) in-state activities may be imputed to an out-of-state retailer (Taxpayer) based on the use of common Barnes & Noble trademarks. New Mexico Tax. & Revenue Dep’t v. Barnesandnoble.com LLC, No. 31, 231 (N.M. Ct. App. Apr. 18, 2012). Notably, Booksellers undertook no physical activities on behalf of the Taxpayer that would independently satisfy the physical presence standard established in Quill. However, according to the court, the goodwill generated by Booksellers’ use of the same Barnes & Noble trademarks helped the Taxpayer establish and maintain a market in the state, thereby creating substantial nexus that is the “functional equivalent” of physical presence under Quill.


Continue Reading