On February 28, 2020, Maryland’s proposed Digital Advertising Tax was the subject of a hearing by the Maryland House of Delegates’ Ways and Means Committee. House Bill 695 would impose a tax on Maryland gross revenues from digital advertising services at a rate of up to a 10%. An archived video of the hearing is

In 2020, state and local tax practitioners have witnessed the emergence of a new trend: the proposed taxation of advertising services and data usage. In this Bottom Line videocast, Charles Capouet and Samantha Trencs discuss:

  • the proposed Maryland tax on gross revenues from digital advertising services
  • potential expansions of the Nebraska and South Dakota

Over 40 state legislatures have convened their 2020 legislative sessions. Last year, states moved quickly to impose collection and remittance obligations on remote sellers and marketplace facilitators in light of Wayfair. This year, states are charting a new course – proposing legislation to expand sales taxes to include advertising services or proposing entirely new taxes

Earlier this month, Maryland State Senators Miller and Ferguson introduced Senate Bill 2, which would tax Maryland digital advertising service gross revenues at up to a 10% rate. Earlier today, the Department of Legislative Services issued the Fiscal and Policy Note for the proposal, which estimates up to $250 million of revenue in the

The Maryland Court of Special Appeals upheld the Comptroller’s determination that an out-of-state pet food seller did not qualify for Public Law 86-272 protection because the seller’s collection of competitive information in Maryland by its employees was not ancillary to solicitation of sales and not de minimis. The out-of-state pet food seller maintained a limited

The Maryland Tax Court reversed the Comptroller’s disallowance of NOLs and essentially struck down a regulation that limited the usage of pre-nexus NOLs. The Comptroller disallowed the taxpayer’s use of NOLs accumulates by entities with no nexus in Maryland that subsequently merged into the taxpayer. The Comptroller relied on a regulation enacted in 2007 that

The Maryland Court of Special Appeals upheld the Maryland Tax Court’s decision holding that the State Comptroller can subject an out-of-state holding company to tax because the holding company did not have economic substance apart from its parent, which was conducting business in the state. In addition to upholding the assessment of tax, the Court

The Maryland Court of Special Appeals held that the Maryland Tax Court erred as a matter of law in ruling that none of the equipment purchased by a public utility company and used in transmitting electricity from a third-party power plant to the utility’s customers in Maryland qualified for a sales tax exemption applicable to